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Lincoln Electric Preferred Dealer - Stick Welders - WeldingMart.com

Stick Welders

(9 products)

Stick welding (also known as Shielded Metal Arc Welding or SMAW) is a welding technique that uses a consumable electrode coated in flux to create an arc that melts the metal being welded and forms a weld pool. The flux coating protects the weld from oxidation and contamination.

Here are the general steps for stick welding:

  1. Prepare the metal surfaces. Before welding, clean the metal surfaces to remove any dirt, rust, or other contaminants using a wire brush or grinder.

  2. Set up your welding equipment. Set up your stick welding machine and connect the ground clamp to your workpiece. Load the electrode and set your amperage according to the manufacturer's recommendations.

  3. Choose the right electrode. Choose the appropriate electrode based on the thickness and type of metal you're welding. Electrodes are labeled with a number that indicates the type of flux coating and the welding position.

  4. Position your workpiece. Position your workpiece so that you can easily access the joint you're welding.

  5. Strike an arc. Hold the electrode at a 10-15 degree angle and 1/8 to 1/4 inch away from the workpiece. Strike an arc by touching the electrode to the workpiece and quickly pulling it back to create a gap. The arc should be maintained at a consistent distance and angle.

  6. Maintain the weld pool. Move the electrode along the joint, adding additional filler metal as needed. The flux coating will produce a slag that will need to be chipped off after each pass.

  7. Finish the weld. Once you've completed the weld, let the weld cool down before chipping off any remaining slag.

  8. Inspect your weld. Check the quality of the weld to make sure it is strong and free of defects. If necessary, make any repairs or adjustments.

Stick welding can be a dangerous activity, so it's important to take safety precautions. Make sure you wear protective clothing, such as gloves, a welding helmet, and flame-resistant clothing. Work in a well-ventilated area, and be sure to read and follow the manufacturer's instructions for your stick welding equipment.

Stick welding (also known as Shielded Metal Arc Welding or SMAW) is a welding technique that uses a consumable electrode coated in flux to create an arc that melts the metal being welded and forms a weld pool. The flux coating protects the weld from oxidation and contamination.

Here are the general steps for stick welding:

  1. Prepare the metal surfaces. Before welding, clean the metal surfaces to remove any dirt, rust, or other contaminants using a wire brush or grinder.

  2. Set up your welding equipment. Set up your stick welding machine and connect the ground clamp to your workpiece. Load the electrode and set your amperage according to the manufacturer's recommendations.

  3. Choose the right electrode. Choose the appropriate electrode based on the thickness and type of metal you're welding. Electrodes are labeled with a number that indicates the type of flux coating and the welding position.

  4. Position your workpiece. Position your workpiece so that you can easily access the joint you're welding.

  5. Strike an arc. Hold the electrode at a 10-15 degree angle and 1/8 to 1/4 inch away from the workpiece. Strike an arc by touching the electrode to the workpiece and quickly pulling it back to create a gap. The arc should be maintained at a consistent distance and angle.

  6. Maintain the weld pool. Move the electrode along the joint, adding additional filler metal as needed. The flux coating will produce a slag that will need to be chipped off after each pass.

  7. Finish the weld. Once you've completed the weld, let the weld cool down before chipping off any remaining slag.

  8. Inspect your weld. Check the quality of the weld to make sure it is strong and free of defects. If necessary, make any repairs or adjustments.

Stick welding can be a dangerous activity, so it's important to take safety precautions. Make sure you wear protective clothing, such as gloves, a welding helmet, and flame-resistant clothing. Work in a well-ventilated area, and be sure to read and follow the manufacturer's instructions for your stick welding equipment.